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How to Bargain for a Carpet, Rug, or Other Goods

How to Bargain for a Carpet, Rug, or Other Goods

I remember the first time I went shopping in a price-tag free environment. I was 20 and alone in Morocco, and rugs were piling up in front of me. A tray with tea magically appeared. I had no idea how to bargain. Details about the amount of work that went into the rugs and how great a time this was for me to purchase, swirled around my head. It was a disorienting experience. I didn’t even want a rug, but I ended up buying one and paying a lot more than I needed to.

A lot of people are put off by bargaining and don’t quite know how to go about it. Over the last 12 years, I’ve found myself bargaining more than a few times, and I’ve come up with a process you might find useful.

  1. Start a negotiation at 1/3 the asking price. If the person is talking a lot and making a big show, you probably want to lower this to 20% of the asking price. I know it seems like a lot, but you’re aiming to pay 50-66% of the original price. When they tell you the price, it helps to look hurt or surprised and say something like, “Very beautiful, but I’m only prepared to spend ___.” Then smile. This is the most uncomfortable part of the negotiation but also the most important.
  2. The dealer will probably respond by repeating all of the special traits of what you’re buying and reminding you that this is ‘quality stuff.’ Then he’ll probably talk about a ‘cash discount’ (if they take cards at all) and bring it down by 5-10%.
  3. Whatever amount they decrease the price, that’s how much you should increase your bid by. It also helps to wait an uncomfortable amount of time before speaking. Settle in, this conversation may take a while.
  4. Next the dealer will talk a lot and also wait an uncomfortable amount of time. He’ll tell you he’s already giving you a better price than he should. DO NOT SAY ANYTHING until he gives you a new price. He’s trying to awkward you into raising your bid without having to counter.
  5. Look dissatisfied and then generally repeat these steps until you’re near the 50-66% percent range you’re aiming for. Then, wait an even more unusually long period of time during which you seem, excited, pensive, and generally deep in thought. Then smile and say conclusively, “OK, (an amount ~10% lower than his last number).” Then offer your hand to shake, and say confidently, “It’s a good price.”
  6. If he then tries to squeeze an extra couple of bucks out of you, go ahead and let him. There’s no pride to be taken in hustling this guy out of a few dollars that, will certainly mean more to him than you.

Now, all of this advice is for actual high-quality handmade or delicate stuff. If you’re buying something that’s machine made you can normally start closer to 10% and end up paying 20-40%.

On the other hand, there are usually 1-2 shops in a market that will give you a much better starting price than other stores. The main rug in the feature photo for instance. One shop showed a rug of the same size and quality with a starting price of $1200. The shop I ended up buying from had a much less over-the-top dealer and gave a starting price of $450. Our friend Sarah wanted the other two rugs so, we bundled the deal and I ended up paying $350 for the main one in the photo. So, less than 1/3 the price at the first shop but only a ~20% discount from where we actually bought it. Maybe we could have squeezed a slightly better deal, but we were happy with the price. Point being, it pays to get initial quotes from a few places.

Also, my experience comes mostly from Morocco, Egypt, and Turkey. In South America bargaining is less of a thing, and people will kind of stop talking to you if you start as low as I’m recommending here. I look forward to trying this method in India and South East Asia in the coming months, and I’ll amend this post if I find things are drastically different.

Happy Shopping!

  • Will
Reflections on Terror from Istanbul

Reflections on Terror from Istanbul

Yesterday a suicide bomber approached a German tour group by an obelisk near Sultanahmet square and took the lives of at least 10 people. Less than 24 hours before, Elizabeth and I were walking around Sultamahmet with our friend Sarah. We talked about the layers of history around us and lamented that American students aren’t exposed more to the richness of culture and history in this part of the world. We stood before the obelisk and realized that, a thousand years ago, we would be in the midst of racing chariots. This was the Hippodrome where emperor Justinian once massacred tens of thousands of protestors.

Elizabeth and I were at breakfast on the other side of the city when the explosion happened. We didn’t hear anything. There were at least a million people closer to the blast than we were. We heard what happened like most people several continents away, on the TV. As details emerged, we began to feel increasingly uneasy. This was the exact place where we had stood the day before. We thought of our families and worried for the groups of German tourists we’d seen around the city. We were lucky.

Blue Mosque 01

Photo Credit: Sarah Payne

We were perhaps too cavalier when we dismissed the concerns from our friends and family about visiting Istanbul. This is a country whose eastern border is an active war zone. The crossing with Syria is porous, to put it mildly. On our first night here, we met a journalist who joked about taking us to the east. As we left, he made sure to be a bit more serious, “Do not go to Syria,” he said. “You will be kidnapped, 100%.”

So, many people are reacting to yesterday’s attack as something that’s tragic but unsurprising. For me it’s underlining a different reality: Nowhere is ‘safe.’ Boston, Paris, Cologne, San Bernardino, an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut. I have friends who were personally affected when a gunman opened fire in a movie theater in my home state of Louisiana. Black people in our country live with the fear that routine interactions with the police could end in death. Sending their children to play in a white part of town has become an act of courage. Terror is everywhere. I don’t feel any less safe today than I did on Monday.

One of the most startling things about yesterday is how quickly a place can appear normal. Yesterday evening people came back to the hostel having just learned what had happened. One man had spent the whole afternoon near Sultanahmet square without knowing a thing. Public transportation in the area was briefly halted, but it’s running again now. Of course the political ripples will continue much longer, and for many people life will never be the same. A certain melancholy hangs in the air. Periodically I imagine what the scene must have looked like and feel sick.

Data shows that the world is actually safer than it’s ever been. But the ways it’s unsafe today are unfamiliar, and they are especially susceptible to narratives of fear and aggression. There is a temptation to define an ‘other’ and rage against them. The broader the ‘other’ we define, the more satisfying our anger will feel. But fear and unquestioning anger will only further radicalize people in all the fractured pieces of our world. I am not a pacifist, but I know that strength cannot be righteous without compassion.

Last week I visited the hill in Turkey where, it’s believed, Saint John wrote his gospel. When I returned I decided to read some of it before going to sleep. I was reminded that Jesus also lived in turbulent and oppressive times. His guidance was clear, “Darkness cannot drive out darkness, only light can do that.” I don’t think you need to be a practicing Christian to think that there’s truth in that idea. In times that seem dark, maybe each of us should do our best to find the light we wish to carry. It’s difficult, but it’s a more uniquely human ability than fear.

  • Will