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Marriage on the Road #2: I’m Happy When You’re Happy

Marriage on the Road #2: I’m Happy When You’re Happy

Will and I got into a big fight in Mendoza, Argentina just as we arrived. It’s not unusual for Will and I to fight after a long, frustrating travel experience (in this case, 5 hours waiting in line at the Chile/Argentina border), but this was different – it needed more than sleep. It needed a solution.

Chile Argentina Border travel
30 minutes into our 5 hour wait to get into Argentina

Will was mad at me. Six weeks abroad, I had fallen into the habit of voicing everything that was bothersome and not voicing anything that was going well. “Why are we in THIS immigration line?” “It would have been better if we got those bus seats.” “Why are these other people so annoying?” “Next time let’s do it this way…” No doubt, I was in a little bit of a funk. I felt like we were traveling too fast. I didn’t have any down time. I was relying on Will’s Spanish too much. The shampoo we brought was leaving some sort of gunk in my hair that made my scalp hurt. We were seeing and doing amazing things, and I was having an incredible time…but I was a little grumpy too.

One thing I took for granted as a single person was that my emotions didn’t usually affect anyone else. If I was in a bad mood, as long as I wasn’t harassing other people, my bad mood only affected me. Now, married and on the road, when I say anything that suggests I’m not happy, my husband stresses about it. And there is no reprieve, such as going to work or the gym or on some errands. We are together all the time, so he has no way to ignore me.

After some talking, arguing, and defensiveness on both sides, I learned that Will needed to know what I was enjoying about the trip. Even when I’m enjoying things, I don’t always say it. But I need to – and on a regular basis. In return, I needed him to listen to some of my legitimate concerns. It was possible to slow down our pace. I could have more down time. We are the only ones controlling our schedule. We committed to both of these things and then sealed the deal with beer and empanadas.

I hadn’t really felt this phenomenon in reverse until we got to Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe. We knew we were going to the falls in low season, which means much of it is dry. We knew this was good because Will wanted to go rafting, and the rafting is better in low water. But when we got to the actual falls, and saw how much more area they usually cover, Will was disappointed.

“Ugh! This is why I don’t have expectations for anything,” Will lamented. I did a double take at the enormous waterfall we were standing in front of. Was this lame? There was no way this was lame, and yet I was starting to feel sad because Will was sad.

I realized that this is what Will was feeling in South America whenever I expressed dissatisfaction. I tried to cheer him up – pointing out everything that was awesome about our experience at Victoria Falls. He eventually perked up, remembering all the reasons why it was good we came during dry season (like Devil’s Pool!) and seeing the awesomeness of the waterfall even at its driest.

Devil's Pool 1
Devils Pool and a double rainbow

With roles reversed, I gained new appreciation for the impact each of us has on each other. When you are together all the time, with very little interaction with other people, your moods become intertwined. Sometimes this requires actively seeking out the positive for the sake of your spouse. Sometimes this requires listening and responding to legitimate concerns that can make or break an experience for the other person. It’s easy to get annoyed with the fact that your mood and choices can devastate another person’s experience – we all want the freedom of our feelings. But if you can let that go, and commit to caring how you affect the other person, the higher stakes will force you out of your funk and help you enjoy your experiences to the fullest.

 

You can find the first installment of Marriage on the Road here.

Victoria Falls: Zambia v. Zimbabwe

Victoria Falls: Zambia v. Zimbabwe

Victoria Falls is more than a waterfall. It’s the hub of a host of adventure tourism activities that sprawl across three countries. We spent two weeks there partaking in a canopy tour, the best one-day white water rafting in the world, two safaris, a swim in Devil’s pool, a sunset cruise, and of course, a day at the falls, which are amazing. And what we did doesn’t even count some of the most popular activities; bungee jumping, a gorge swing, or a helicopter tour. While we did a lot, we still took a slow pace and ended up spending much of our time like hippos, submerged in the pool or lazily drying next to it.

But any visit to the falls is ultimately framed by two questions: Where to stay (Livingstone, Zambia or Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe)? and When to go (high water or low water)?

Where to stay? Zambia v. Zimbabwe

Let’s be clear, no matter where you stay you’ll be able to see the falls from both the Zambia and Zimbabwe sides. It’s fairly easy to cross the border and return in a single day. Doing so requires 3 taxis.  From Zimbabwe you take one taxi to the border ($5), one across the border ($5), and one to Livingstone ($10). Then repeat on the way back. There are plenty of taxis lined up at each point. Just make sure you get a Kaza Visa when you fly in. It’s $50 but allows for unlimited border crossings between the two countries. Otherwise, you’ll get hit with serious visa fees each time you want to cross.

Still, the question remains, which side to choose?

Seeing the Falls

For views of the falls Zimbabwe is definitely a stronger choice. The falls drop from Zambia and fall in the river that divides the two countries. From the Zimbabwe side you can walk the entire length of the falls and there over a dozen viewing points which face the falls head on. Also, we enjoyed finding monkeys who make their home in the rainforest on the Zimbabwe side.

Victoria Falls Zimbabwe Travel

The Zambian side however offers a view from the side of the falls that is dry during low-water. During high-water your limited in your perspective and during low water you can’t see much at all. This photo is from the Zimbabwe side, but you can see what you might view from the Zambian side.  This whole area is covered by a wall of water during high season.

Victoria Falls Low Water Travel

Price

Some older research online says that Zimbabwe is cheaper so we were not so pleasantly surprised to find some of the highest prices we’ve seen anywhere in Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe. The reason being that after a bout of hyper-inflation (you can buy 10 billion dollar notes in the street) Zimbabwe switched to the US dollar as its currency. The dollar is strong now so prices are expensive. A driver confided to us he was afraid the strong dollar would keep away the local tourists who normally come around Christmas. On the bright side, you can get $50 bills from ATMs which comes in handy when traveling across Africa.

Zambia was much cheaper for expenses like food and accommodation. However, the cost for activities, which are priced in US dollars on both sides of the falls, are pretty much identical.

Infrastructure

We encountered both scheduled and unscheduled power outages on both sides of the falls but they were definitely more frequent of the Zambian side. Apparently Zambia is dependent on hydro-electric power and when the river is low electricity becomes harder to produce.

Our first night there was a mess. Power went out in our hostel, taking the water pump with it. We ventured into the street to find comfort in a nice dinner and found the whole city was in darkness. Fortunately the super market had a generator. It was packed, and people were sweeping the floors to prep for closing, but we got some sausages, bread, and cheese and made due.

The Towns

Victoria Falls is a small tourist town, built completely around the falls. The main street is mostly tour companies and places to buy souvenirs. Baboons hang out in the streets. You see the occasional warthog. The OK supermarket is pretty well stocked. You can also walk to the falls from the town, which is quite charming.

Livingstone on the other hand is a proper city with more options for restaurants and night life and two substantially nicer supermarkets.

Black Rhinos

The only activity that can’t be easily done from both sides is a game drive in the private Stanley and Livingstone game reserve. They are a certified participant in the black rhino breeding program and are probably the single best place to get a chance to see this very endangered species amongst other animals.

Black Rhino Victoria Falls Travel

Overall

We had a better time in Zimbabwe. But this may be largely due to the number of unexpected outages in Zambia, a lack of air circulation at our hostel (Fawlty towers) which led to very unpleasant nights and the fact we met a lot of great people at our backpackers (Victoria Falls Backpackers). We did find the souvenir markets to be better and more affordable in Zambia and transportation in and out of the area is easier and cheaper to arrange.

When to go? High Water v. Low Water

Victoria Falls gets its fame from being the longest waterfall in the world. However, this is only really true in high water. During high water you can see the fall in all its 1.8km glory and there’s enough mist to drench anyone who gets near. As one guide told us, “you may as well bring shampoo.”

But we were there during low water. At first we were disappointed that there was no water for over half of the falls, but we ended up being glad we visited during this time since low water season has many distinct advantages.

1.Devil’s Pool & Livingstone Island – On the edge of the main falls there’s a spot called Devil’s Pool where you can safely swim right up to the edge of the falls and look into the gorge while water drops from the cliff just a few feet away. It’s a phenomenal experience and not an option during high-water when it would be impossible to not be taken over the edge.  The featured photo also shows us on Livingstone Island, which is the entrance point to Devil’s Pool and only accessible during low water.

Devil's Pool Victoria Falls Travel

2. Rafting – Obviously we didn’t raft in both seasons but apparently some of the best rapids are closed during high water for safety reasons. Low water has the reputation of being the best season for rafting. Will says it was one of the most exhilarating experiences of his life.

3. Animals – If you also want to go on a safari low water is a better time for two reasons. 1) There’s less water so animals are more concentrated around the areas where water exists. 2) The bush is dry and it’s easier to spot animals. During high water, leaves and green bushes end up obscuring your view.

Still if seeing ‘the smoke that thunders’ in its full Discovery Channel scope is your sole focus you want to make sure you’re there during high-water. (High water is Feb-Aug, with a peak in April, Low water is Sept-Jan)

All the best!

Ciao,

Elizabeth

Hiking Table Mountain – Skeleton’s Gorge

Hiking Table Mountain – Skeleton’s Gorge

Table Mountain offers a sense of majesty to Cape Town, South Africa. It’s steep granite cliffs rise over 3,500 feet (1,055 m) above the city and bring a kind of unity to the disparate neighborhoods that encircle it. No matter where you are, a view of the mountain isn’t more than a few feet away.

Hiking Table Mountain was always on the top of our to do list for Cape Town. There are many routes to the top (including a cable car for those less inclined to trekking). We opted to hike Smut’s Track via Skeleton Gorge and were not disappointed.

Skeleton’s Gorge actually starts at the back of the Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens. If we had realized how beautiful the gardens are, we would have arrived earlier to spend more time there.

Table Mountain kirstenbosch

kirstenbosch botanical gardens

 

But unfortunately, we were already arriving late and had to walk straight through.

Kirstenbosch

Table Mountain Skeleton's gorge

 

The trail started out easy enough.

Table mountain skeleton's gorge

 

After a short while, there were a series of wooden ladders  to climb.

Table Mountain skeleton's gorge

 

It rained the day before so, we couldn’t climb up through the riverbed like you’re ‘supposed’ to. Instead, we followed some patches of barbed wire and emerged from the canopy. This route was less marked and involved some unexpectedly tricky rock scrambling. (Another American couple was so put off by this that they decided to turn back). But we thought it added a sense of adventure and were rewarded with our first glimpse of the city below.

Table mountain skeleton's gorge

 

Along the way, there were multiple patches of wild flowers.

Table Mountain wild flowers

 

It took us about 90min to reach the to reach the top of the gorge. But we still had a good bit of hiking to do…

Table Mountain skeletons gorge

 

We began our trek across the top of the mountain.

smut's track

Table Mountain skeleton gorge

 

Table Mountain has a higher density of plant life than most rainforests.

Tabe Mountain flowers

 

There are also random collections of cool looking bolders.

Table mountain smut's track

 

Once we reached the summit, we stopped for our lunch of prepackaged Woolworth’s sandwiches.

Table Mountain beacon

 

The trail is mostly well marked, but there are a few parts where you need to figure things out. Like this part, where we had to climb down into this tunnel like passageway.

Hiking table mountain

 

Eventually, we arrived at the beach side of the mountain.

Hiking table mountain beach

 

and opted to take the cable car down.

Table mountain cable car

 

We’ve been on a number of hikes this trip, but Table Mountain has easily been our favorite. The views, variety of terrain, flowers, and relaxed pace left us smiling nearly the entire time.

Highly Recommended,

Will & Elizabeth

Biking to Wineries in Mendoza

Biking to Wineries in Mendoza

The hum of rubber on the flat pavement. The gentle movement of a sun-warmed breeze past your face. The buzz of how many glasses of wine? Wasn’t counting. This is why we came to Mendoza.

Mendoza is known for producing that famous Argentine Malbec wine everyone has heard of. We spent four days soaking up its laid back vineyard vibe- but we hadn’t taken a wine tour yet. On our final day there we decided to scrap the formal wine tour, rent bikes, and have a leisurely pedal from winery to winery.

We took the city bus to Maipu, where all the wineries are located, and headed straight for Mr. Hugo’s bike rental. Mr. Hugo himself fitted our bikes and sent us on our way. We were lucky – we arrived just as a bike ban had been lifted due to strong winds in the morning. By 1pm, all that was left was a pleasant breeze.

Mendoza Wine Tour 02

The streets of Maipu have dedicated bike lanes with curbs, and the roads are completely flat. We started our afternoon with empanadas at the local beer garden before heading to Trapiche, one of Mendoza’s most famous wineries, for a tour and tasting.

We saw antique wine making machinery, original to the winery. Will even got to taste some unaged wine straight from the tap.

Mendoza Wine Tour 13

As we made our way to the sleek tasting room, we were lucky once again– our tasting of 3 wines somehow turned into 5. I tried Grappa for the first time, though I will likely decline it in the future.

Mendoza Wine Tour 29

Thank goodness we were on bikes, because the Olive Oil Factory – surprise of the day – got us a little drunk. What we found was not a factory tour, but a tasting room. I don’t know if the olive spread we tried was the best thing I’ve ever tasted, or if I was just a little intoxicated – either way, it was amazing.

Mendoza Wine Tour 42

After introducing us to 10 different liquors, the Olive man asked “Would you like to try some absinthe?” “Sure!” we replied. “Where is it from?” Will asked after we had taken our shots. “I made it!” he exclaimed. Needless to say, it was very strong.

Mendoza Wine Tour 46

We rounded out our day with a stop at a winery museum and a 5 tasting special at another wine bar. In the end, we bought one bottle of olive oil and received two free bottles of wine. The only thing that could have made the day better was more time.

Mendoza Wine Tour 56

If you go to Mendoza, skip the formal wine tour and skip the organized bike/wine trip. Head to Maipu (or better yet, stay there!) and go see Mr. Hugo. The freedom to pedal where you wish in this flat, safe town is well worth the city bus ticket!

Ciao,

Elizabeth

 

Sorry, I Just Didn’t Like Valparaiso

Sorry, I Just Didn’t Like Valparaiso

Listen, I know everyone loves Valparaiso.  It’s trendy, romantic, filled with street art and hilltop views and fully endorsed by Pablo Neruda himself. When we told people we were going to Santiago, the response again and again from fellow travelers was, “oh, make sure you get to Valparaiso.” But here’s the thing.  I just didn’t like Valparaiso.

There were some specific activities in Valparaiso that I absolutely loved. Among them were visiting La Sebastiana (Pablo Neruda’s house), tasting several Carmeneres at Antonia’s Wine Boutique, and enjoying churros and chocolate at one of the many adorable sweet shops. Unfortunately, these things could not overtake the things I hated: the dirtiness of the streets, the graffiti on every building (not the street art, that’s different), and a bad run in with another guest at the hostel.

We arrived on Saturday around noon to find the city rainy and 10 degrees colder than Santiago.  Determined to love Valparaiso, I remained upbeat as we checked into our hostel and set out to find some lunch.

Valparaiso Street Art 1

En route, we gingerly danced between the puddles and ridiculous amount of dog poop that filled the sidewalks.  The rain made the slimy streets worse, and it was hard to enjoy the stroll. We finally found a place called Mastadon that specializes in Chorillana, a dish invented in Valparaiso. A little heavy, but fully embraceable by a couple of Americans.

Valparaiso Chorrillana

As night fell, the rain stopped, and we found a route with less dog poop – up a cobblestone street to this adorable corner:

Valparaiso Streets 06

We located Antonia’s Wine Boutique, recommended to us by an Australian couple we met in San Pedro.  We opened the place up at 9pm, tasting an incredible Carmenere.  The owner/host chatted with us about what type of wines we like and brought us a complimentary meat and cheese platter.  We had a great view of street art and the rolling blocks of colorful houses.  Things were looking up.

Valparaiso Street 20

Back at the hostel, Will and I passed out on our hostel bunk beds at midnight.

Around 5am, I awoke to someone shaking me. I opened my eyes to the lights on and a 20-somthing girl yelling at me in Spanish.  The bunk bed was very low, so I couldn’t sit up, just lay there being yelled at.  When she took a breath, I said “I don’t speak Spanish,” to which she responded “English then, speak! Speak!” Will and I finally gathered that she thought the bed I was sleeping in was her bed.  After she continued to yell at a staff member for another 10 minutes, and took several photos of me in the bed, she was finally ushered out of the room.

Here’s what happened: When you stay in a hostel dorm, most hostels record which bed you claim. For example: Bed 3 – Elizabeth, Bed 4 -Will. This hostel does not record which beds are claimed, so they can’t tell you which ones are available when you check in. It’s just guessing.

This girl thought she claimed the same bed I had claimed. I checked in first (and went to bed 5 hours earlier) so I don’t feel bad about keeping the bed. Additionally, there were two more free beds in the room, available for claiming when she arrived back from the bar. This is how a hostel works. You take a free bed. You certainly don’t shake a stranger awake. If you have a problem you go talk to the staff person at the desk.

The girl was with an older gentleman who generally looked mortified. Later, the hostel staff tried to act like the girl was sorry, but didn’t know how to say it in English.   It was evident from her demeanor that she was not sorry in the least. Was I hurt? No. Was I pissed? Yes. Will wanted to confront her in Spanish, but I suggested we just get an early start and vamos.

So we headed to Plaseo 21 de Mayo – another enthusiastic recommendation from our Australian friends in San Pedro. We took a tram to the top of the hill and looked out. The harbor full of shipping containers just wasn’t enough to lift my morning funk.

Plaseo 21 de Mayo 03

Although this view was nicer.

Plaseo 21 de Mayo 10

The sky looked like it would hold out against the rain, so we decided to walk across downtown to La Sebastiana. On the way, we took note of the street art (while trying not to step in dog poop- seriously, it’s everywhere).

Valparaiso Street Art 02

Valparaiso Street Art 04

Valparaiso Street Art 03

Finally we reached Pablo Neruda’s house. Here you can see Neruda’s morning view as he awoke.

Valpariaso La Sebastiana 12

We ended our afternoon with churros and chocolate on our favorite cobblestoned corner before catching the bus back to Santiago.

Valparaiso Churros and Chocolate

I know, I know. The incident at the hostel and the weather were not Valparaiso’s fault. Perhaps I went in with expectations that were too high. Perhaps the dirty streets (I saw a roadkill rat blocking a street drain) prevented me from feeling the romance of the city. Perhaps I simply prefer the urban style of Santiago.  In any case – there are wonderful things to do in Valparaiso… it just wasn’t the city for me.

Ciao,

Elizabeth

One Day Walking Tour in Santiago

One Day Walking Tour in Santiago

Santiago greeted us with a beautiful, sunny, 72 degree day – perfect for our self-styled walking tour.  We were staying in Barrio Brasil at La Casa Roja – an old mansion turned hostel.  Barrio Brasil is just off of downtown, which made it the perfect location to start our walk.  We passed through the central business district, with its pedestrian streets and kiosks selling snacks and philosophy books, on our way to the other famous barrios of Santiago.

Santiago Downtown Travel

We ran into Plaza Moneda, the location of the presidential palace, or La Moneda.  We looked on as a protest took place.  We didn’t yet know that this was a major site of the 1973 military coup.

Santiago La Moneda Travel

From the downtown we headed toward Bella Vista, one of Santiago’s most popular neighborhoods.  Just before reaching this barrio is the National Museum of Fine Art, where the collection of sculpture particularly moved and intrigued us.

Santiago Art Museum Travel

From the Art Museum we headed to San Cristobal Hill, which took up an enormous green area on our tourist map.  The hill is extremely steep, so we took the San Cristobal “Funicular” up instead.  The Funicular begins and ends in matching castles at the top and bottom of the hill – with one intermediate stop at the Santiago Zoo.

Santiago San Cristobal Hill Travel

When we got off the tram, we could see the true expanse of Santiago.  Seventy-five percent of Chile’s population lives in cities – and Santiago is by far the largest.  The view was amazing.

Santiago San Cristobal Hill Travel

Looking up, we could see the Chilean flag with the statue of the Virgin Mary behind it.  We weren’t at the top yet!

Santiago San Cristobal Hill Travel

The path to the top wound through gardens and various sections of an enormous outdoor church, including an outdoor altar and amphitheater.  Finally, we reached the Virgin Mary.

Santiago San Cristobal Hill Travel

The Funicular was less crowded on the way down.  This old-timey tram made me a little nervous in all its Industrial Revolution glory.  Can you spot my anxious grip on the rail post?  Will loved it.

Santiago San Cristobal Hill Travel

On the way back to La Casa Roja, we took particular notice of the street art in Barrio Bella Vista.  Here are some of our favorites.

Santiago Street Art 03

Santiago Street Art Travel

Santiago Street Art Travel

Our one day walking tour in Santiago was blessed with beautiful weather for exploring.  A quick recap of the the highlights: the National Museum of Fine Arts, San Cristobal Hill, and street art in Bella Vista.

Other highlights from other days in Santiago include: the lovely park Santa Lucia Hill, dining in Barrio Lastarria, visiting the Museo de la Memoria, and drinking lots of Carmenere wine.

Santiago is a complex, intellectual, passionate, and reserved city.  It leaves you wanting to know more about it, and feeling completely at home at the same time.  I would go back any day.

Ciao,

Elizabeth

Museo de la Memoria (Santiago, Chile)

Museo de la Memoria (Santiago, Chile)

I had no idea, entering the Museo de la Memoria, that Chile shares September 11th with the US as a day that lives in infamy. On September 11th, 1973 the military coup that would place Chile under dictatorship for 17 years ripped through the nation and resulted in the executions, disappearances, and torture of thousands of Chileans.

The museum is dedicated to telling the story of the coup, dictatorship, human rights violations, and citizen resistance. I went into the museum only knowing that there had been a military dictatorship and that some people said the CIA was involved. I came out with more questions than answers – wondering, thinking, and feeling many different things.

As we entered the museum, we were greeted by life-sized cut outs of individuals who had disappeared, holding up their identification cards.  These cutouts continued throughout the museum. One of my first reactions was surprise at how little I knew about these events. Even Will, who received a Latin American History certificate in college, knew very little about the coup and dictatorship. Both of us moved through the first major room – dedicated to telling the story of the coup – astounded by what happened in Chile. We repeatedly used surprised tones to exclaim to one another “and then they bombed the presidential palace?!?”, “wait – Salvador Allende (the president) shot himself?!?”, and we huddled around the screen that showed his final radio address.

Chile1973

What struck me second was how honest and thorough the museum is in describing the human rights violations and honoring those who suffered. These exhibits are particularly powerful because they do not hold back detail and frequently involve first hand accounts of torture, which also makes them hard to stomach. This is an approach that we’d never see in the US. Here is a beautiful museum dedicated to telling the story of human rights atrocities that were committed by the government. Even our civil rights museums focus on the struggle of the oppressed rather than the wrongs committed by the system. It’s inspiring that Chile wholly owns and mourns these events at the same time.

 

[pullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]This is an approach that we’d never see in the US. Here is a beautiful museum dedicated to telling the story of human rights atrocities that were committed by the government.[/pullquote]

 

We got kicked out the museum before we were finished – right as we started to learn about the clergy, women’s

groups, and worker’s groups who began to protest and question the mass disappearances. We had been there 90 minutes but hadn’t reached the end by closing time. I left wanting to know the history of Allende’s elected government, more information about who Pinochet (the military dictator) was, and details on who disappeared and why (it’s implied in the exhibits, but I wanted to know more.) We speculated on how involved the US had been in the coup and dictatorship and talked about the destructive cold war anxieties of our government. We talked about how the military dictatorship ended with an election rather than more violence – and why that is not what’s happening after the Arab Spring.

Museo de Memoria is powerful, disturbing, and inspiring. It tells a story that raises so many questions and thoughts about Chile and the greater world. If you are in Santiago, please go. Just get there at least two hours before closing time. You’ll need it.

Note: The featured photo is attributed to Francisco Javier Cornejos here and is under this Creative Commons license with some rights reserved. We used some minor cropping to fit the photo to our site.

Cathedrals of Salt – San Pedro de Atacama Day 3

Cathedrals of Salt – San Pedro de Atacama Day 3

On our third day in San Pedro de Atacama, we headed toward the Cathedrals of Salt. The journey took us into the Andes, across the world’s largest extinct volcano crater, past a number of volcanic rock features, and around several high altitude lagoons.

But first we had to drive toward the mountains. All of the peaks in the distance here are volcanoes.

San Pedro de Atacama Andes

We stopped to eat a breakfast of bread and cheese on the side of the road.

San Pedro de Atacama Andes breakfast

Eventually we passed by the volcanoes we had seen on the horizon.

San Pedro de Atacama volcano travel

We stopped at a lagoon.

San PEdro de Atacama lagoon

Where we played,

San Pedr de Atacama lagoon

and danced on the ice.

San Pedro de Atacama lagoon

Later we approached rocks made of volcanic ash that have been eroded into surprising formations.

San Pedro de Atacama monks

Can you make me out lounging in the shade of this one?

San Pedro de Atacama monks

Here it is a bit closer up.

San Pedro de Atacama monks

We were encouraged to use the shade and crannies of these rocks as our Pachamama (mother earth) toilet.

San Pedro de Atacama pachmama

Next we drove into the largest extinct crated in the world. Everything until the mountains is a crater and there’s as much space on the other side. The specs of black are pieces of obsidian that have been resting there for millions of years. (we were encouraged to take some home and we obliged)

San Pedro de Atacama volcano crater obsidian

Nearby we found the ‘White Monks.” The two distinct lines that run across these rocks, mark the 3 different eruptions that created them.

San Pedro de Atacama white monks

It’s cool to wander around them.

San Pedro de Atacama white monks

San Pedro de Atacama white monks

Eventually we arrived at the Cathedrals of Salt.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal

It’s a great place to stroll.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal

Or meditate.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal travel

Eventually we ended up at this lagoon.

San Pedro de Atacama lagoon

Where we watched vicuna. (an endangered species)

San Pedro de Atacama Vicuna

Our guide was the one who popularized this tour a few years ago. He told legends about the family relationships between the volcanoes. All in all it was a surprising and incredible day.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal travel

Check out our other San Pedro de Atacama Galleries:

Day 1 Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley

Day 2 Piedras Rojas and Atacama Salt Flats

Day 4 Valle de la Luna

Will & Elizabeth

 

Piedras Rojas (Red Rocks): San Pedro de Atacama Day 2

Piedras Rojas (Red Rocks): San Pedro de Atacama Day 2

The thing about a desert is that it is very hot during the day, and it’s that much colder at night.  At daybreak, we paced the street outside our hostel to keep warm, waiting to be picked up by the tour bus for Piedras Rojas (Red Rocks).  The bus was late, and we ended up watching the sunrise over our street and the volcanos in the distance.

San Pedro de Atacama sunrise

On the way to Piedras Rojas, we stopped for breakfast and to see an old church with multiple cactus wood features.  This wood is made from cactus that had been dried for a year.  The panels are connected with cactus fiber.

San Pedro de Atacama cactus wood travel

When we arrived at Piedras Rojas, the tour guide cautioned us not to let our emotions overwhelm our experience.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

We could see why she warned us.  The red rocks were created from volcanic lava and ash.  The lagoon that had collected was frozen over and looked blue green.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

The mountains in the back ground are either volcanos or piles of volcanic ash.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

We gazed out over the lagoon…

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

Will felt so great, he thought he could take off.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

But he settled for a little meditation.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

Next, we headed to one of the highest lakes in the world.  On the way, we saw a family of Vicuna, which are an endangered relative of the llama.

San Pedro de Atacama Vicunas Travel

We had to walk to Lagunas Altiplanicus from the entrance because snow had blocked the road.

San Pedro de Atacama Lagunas Atiplanicas Travel

So Will took advantage of the situation.

San Pedro de Atacama Laguas Altiplanicus Travel

We stopped in a small town for lunch and the bathroom.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats Travel

Then we headed to the Atacama Salt Flats, created (of course) by volcanic ash and the evaporation cycle of these lagoons.  How many flamingos can you find?

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats

We got to hold a flamingo egg.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats Travel

And see a number of flamingos.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats 11

We strolled along the salt flat.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats Travel

And enjoyed the close of the day and the ride back to San Pedro.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats

Stayed tuned for more tomorrow!

Check out pics from our other days in San Pedro:

Day 1 Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley

Day 3 Cathedrals of Salt

Day 4 Valle de la Luna

Elizabeth & Will

Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley: San Pedro de Atacama Day 1

Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley: San Pedro de Atacama Day 1

San Pedro has several claims to fame. It’s in the driest desert in the world, adjacent to some of the world’s largest lithium mines, and is populated by incredibly friendly people (lithium in the water?).  It’s also a half-day trip from dozens of volcanic features unlike anything else in the world. These volcanos, including one of the world’s two super volcanos, worked to mold the landscape millions of years ago. Our six days in San Pedro allowed us to see geological formations we didn’t even know existed.

Fully exploring “The Atacama” requires guided tours or renting a car.  We booked four outings with Flamingo Tours and got a package deal.  Our adventure started with a midnight stargazing (no pictures, sorry!)

The next day we were picked up from the hostel at 8am for the Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley. We started by climbing up to some ancient petroglyphs carved into volcanic rock.  Here we see images of elders in a ceremonial circle.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

When the rocks were volcanic ash, the ash moved very quickly and formed air pockets.  Now these old air pockets make the rocks look like Swiss cheese.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

Will contributed his artistic talent to the petroglyphs…I mean… Will pointed out these flamingos.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

We moved to another area to see even more petroglyphs.  We were instructed to stay on the path.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs

Which led us to these images of this llama and baby llama…

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

And this “two headed dragon.” The lack of wind in this area prevents the petroglyphs from eroding away.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

Next we headed for Rainbow Valley. We were dropped off at the top of the path, where Will immediately climbed this rock.  Can you find him?

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

We made our way toward the rainbow color rock.  Different minerals have caused the rock to turn multicolored.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

Will meditated for a moment.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

And I contemplated the copper in the green rock.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

Rainbow Valley has many views, and many colors.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

We tried to capture as many colors as we could before our day’s adventure ended.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

Check out our other galleries from San Pedro de Atacama:

Day 2 Piedras Rojas and Atacama Salt Flats

Day 3 Cathedrals of Salt

Day 4 Valle de la Luna

Elizabeth & Will