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Cathedrals of Salt – San Pedro de Atacama Day 3

Cathedrals of Salt – San Pedro de Atacama Day 3

On our third day in San Pedro de Atacama, we headed toward the Cathedrals of Salt. The journey took us into the Andes, across the world’s largest extinct volcano crater, past a number of volcanic rock features, and around several high altitude lagoons.

But first we had to drive toward the mountains. All of the peaks in the distance here are volcanoes.

San Pedro de Atacama Andes

We stopped to eat a breakfast of bread and cheese on the side of the road.

San Pedro de Atacama Andes breakfast

Eventually we passed by the volcanoes we had seen on the horizon.

San Pedro de Atacama volcano travel

We stopped at a lagoon.

San PEdro de Atacama lagoon

Where we played,

San Pedr de Atacama lagoon

and danced on the ice.

San Pedro de Atacama lagoon

Later we approached rocks made of volcanic ash that have been eroded into surprising formations.

San Pedro de Atacama monks

Can you make me out lounging in the shade of this one?

San Pedro de Atacama monks

Here it is a bit closer up.

San Pedro de Atacama monks

We were encouraged to use the shade and crannies of these rocks as our Pachamama (mother earth) toilet.

San Pedro de Atacama pachmama

Next we drove into the largest extinct crated in the world. Everything until the mountains is a crater and there’s as much space on the other side. The specs of black are pieces of obsidian that have been resting there for millions of years. (we were encouraged to take some home and we obliged)

San Pedro de Atacama volcano crater obsidian

Nearby we found the ‘White Monks.” The two distinct lines that run across these rocks, mark the 3 different eruptions that created them.

San Pedro de Atacama white monks

It’s cool to wander around them.

San Pedro de Atacama white monks

San Pedro de Atacama white monks

Eventually we arrived at the Cathedrals of Salt.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal

It’s a great place to stroll.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal

Or meditate.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal travel

Eventually we ended up at this lagoon.

San Pedro de Atacama lagoon

Where we watched vicuna. (an endangered species)

San Pedro de Atacama Vicuna

Our guide was the one who popularized this tour a few years ago. He told legends about the family relationships between the volcanoes. All in all it was a surprising and incredible day.

San Pedro de Atacama catedrales de sal travel

Check out our other San Pedro de Atacama Galleries:

Day 1 Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley

Day 2 Piedras Rojas and Atacama Salt Flats

Day 4 Valle de la Luna

Will & Elizabeth

 

Piedras Rojas (Red Rocks): San Pedro de Atacama Day 2

Piedras Rojas (Red Rocks): San Pedro de Atacama Day 2

The thing about a desert is that it is very hot during the day, and it’s that much colder at night.  At daybreak, we paced the street outside our hostel to keep warm, waiting to be picked up by the tour bus for Piedras Rojas (Red Rocks).  The bus was late, and we ended up watching the sunrise over our street and the volcanos in the distance.

San Pedro de Atacama sunrise

On the way to Piedras Rojas, we stopped for breakfast and to see an old church with multiple cactus wood features.  This wood is made from cactus that had been dried for a year.  The panels are connected with cactus fiber.

San Pedro de Atacama cactus wood travel

When we arrived at Piedras Rojas, the tour guide cautioned us not to let our emotions overwhelm our experience.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

We could see why she warned us.  The red rocks were created from volcanic lava and ash.  The lagoon that had collected was frozen over and looked blue green.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

The mountains in the back ground are either volcanos or piles of volcanic ash.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

We gazed out over the lagoon…

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

Will felt so great, he thought he could take off.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

But he settled for a little meditation.

San Pedro de Atacama Piedras Rojas Travel

Next, we headed to one of the highest lakes in the world.  On the way, we saw a family of Vicuna, which are an endangered relative of the llama.

San Pedro de Atacama Vicunas Travel

We had to walk to Lagunas Altiplanicus from the entrance because snow had blocked the road.

San Pedro de Atacama Lagunas Atiplanicas Travel

So Will took advantage of the situation.

San Pedro de Atacama Laguas Altiplanicus Travel

We stopped in a small town for lunch and the bathroom.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats Travel

Then we headed to the Atacama Salt Flats, created (of course) by volcanic ash and the evaporation cycle of these lagoons.  How many flamingos can you find?

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats

We got to hold a flamingo egg.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats Travel

And see a number of flamingos.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats 11

We strolled along the salt flat.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats Travel

And enjoyed the close of the day and the ride back to San Pedro.

San Pedro de Atacama Salt Flats

Stayed tuned for more tomorrow!

Check out pics from our other days in San Pedro:

Day 1 Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley

Day 3 Cathedrals of Salt

Day 4 Valle de la Luna

Elizabeth & Will

Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley: San Pedro de Atacama Day 1

Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley: San Pedro de Atacama Day 1

San Pedro has several claims to fame. It’s in the driest desert in the world, adjacent to some of the world’s largest lithium mines, and is populated by incredibly friendly people (lithium in the water?).  It’s also a half-day trip from dozens of volcanic features unlike anything else in the world. These volcanos, including one of the world’s two super volcanos, worked to mold the landscape millions of years ago. Our six days in San Pedro allowed us to see geological formations we didn’t even know existed.

Fully exploring “The Atacama” requires guided tours or renting a car.  We booked four outings with Flamingo Tours and got a package deal.  Our adventure started with a midnight stargazing (no pictures, sorry!)

The next day we were picked up from the hostel at 8am for the Petroglyphs and Rainbow Valley. We started by climbing up to some ancient petroglyphs carved into volcanic rock.  Here we see images of elders in a ceremonial circle.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

When the rocks were volcanic ash, the ash moved very quickly and formed air pockets.  Now these old air pockets make the rocks look like Swiss cheese.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

Will contributed his artistic talent to the petroglyphs…I mean… Will pointed out these flamingos.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

We moved to another area to see even more petroglyphs.  We were instructed to stay on the path.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs

Which led us to these images of this llama and baby llama…

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

And this “two headed dragon.” The lack of wind in this area prevents the petroglyphs from eroding away.

San Pedro de Atacama Petroglyphs Travel

Next we headed for Rainbow Valley. We were dropped off at the top of the path, where Will immediately climbed this rock.  Can you find him?

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

We made our way toward the rainbow color rock.  Different minerals have caused the rock to turn multicolored.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

Will meditated for a moment.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

And I contemplated the copper in the green rock.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

Rainbow Valley has many views, and many colors.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

We tried to capture as many colors as we could before our day’s adventure ended.

San Pedro de Atacama Rainbow Valley Travel

Check out our other galleries from San Pedro de Atacama:

Day 2 Piedras Rojas and Atacama Salt Flats

Day 3 Cathedrals of Salt

Day 4 Valle de la Luna

Elizabeth & Will

 

Hiking Colca Canyon Photo Gallery

Hiking Colca Canyon Photo Gallery

After almost a week in Arequipa, we decided to take a two day hiking trip into Colca Canyon. We booked the hike through our hostel and were picked up at 3am by a small bus. The first stop was Cruz del Condors- a look out point known for glimpses of Andean condors, the largest flying birds in the world.

Condor in Colca Canyon

Here’s a pic with human beings for scale:

Condor flying in Colca Canyon Peru

During the stretches when we couldn’t see condors, we admired the cactus flowers.

Colca Canyon Cactus FlowerNext we arrived at the trail head at the top of the canyon, and looked down to The Oasis where we’d sleep that night.

Colca Canyon Oasis

We paused to enjoy the breeze.

Hiking Colca Canyon

And admire the giant cacti.

Colca Canyon Cactus

Some stretches were long and not that steep.

Colca Canyon 3

We paused to rest.

Colca Canyon 5

And admired how far we had climbed down. Over 3,300 ft. by the end of it.

Colca Canyon

Eventually we reached the river at the bottom.

Colca Canyon 7

Some locals prepared us lunch.  Alpaca stirfry.

Lunch in Colca Canyon

And we relaxed.

Relaxing in Colca Canyon

But we still had several miles to hike to the oasis and we were getting tired.

Colca Canyon hike

Still, when we looked back to admire the valley behind us we saw that it was beautiful.

Colca Canyon Oasis (2)

Our guide paused to explain about the culture of people in the canyon and how different plants were used as natural remedies since there’s no hospital around. We knew we were approaching civilization when we started seeing ads.

Colca Canyon Hotel sign

After almost 7 hours of hiking we finally reached the charming streets of The Oasis.

Colca Canyon Oasis

We drank some beer and had a nice dinner. We started hiking back up at 5AM the next morning (sorry no pictures).  We were given the option to take a mule up instead, but we declined.

On the way back we stopped in small towns with markets and cool colonial churches.

Colonial Church in Colca PeruWe also stopped for views of the pre-Incan terraces that are carved into the mountains.

Colca Pre-Incan Terraces

The terraces stretch for miles and miles and truly cause you to marvel at how rich the civilization which created them must have been.

pre-Incan terraces in Colca Canyon

The final stop was at over 16,000 ft. above sea level where we could see the peaks of several volcanoes. But here’s a pic with the rest of our hiking group. Four Spaniards and a woman from Macao.

Colca Volcanoe point

Depending who you ask, Colca is either the deepest or second deepest canyon in the world, though we didn’t hike into the deepest part.

The hike was tough, but all in all, it was one of our favorite parts of the trip so far.

If you’re in southern Peru, you should definitely check it out.  You can always take the mule back up.

Will & Elizabeth

Machu Picchu Photo Gallery

Machu Picchu Photo Gallery

We got in line for the day’s first set of busses at 4:30 AM, to make sure we were some of the first people let into Machu Picchu. The air was cool, and clouds clung to the nearly empty ruins around us.

Machu Picchu in fog

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We climbed a not often climbed set of stairs.

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And started to explore the architecture.

Temple of the Condor Machu Picchu

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We got friendly with the local llamas,

Llamas in Machu Picchu

and started to wonder: what’s cooler, Machu Picchu or the surrounding mountains?

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Elizabeth was quick to point out that the Incas thought of them as one and the same.

Machu Picchu alone fog

We looked around and congratulated ourselves again on arriving before the crowds. It really is pretty cool to be here alone.

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After a little over an hour of exploring the ruins, we decided to take advantage of the second part of the tickets we purchased and climb The Mountain! The Mountain is advertised as a trail, but it’s really more of a 2,000+ ft. staircase.

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At first, the views below us were clouded in, well, clouds… But soon Machu Picchu began to appear.

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Machu Picchu from above

Machu Picchu from above

After a few thousand more steps and many breaks, we reached the top.

La Montana Machu Picchu the Mountain

And we saw that it was good.

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Eventually, we had to head back down… Parts were treacherously narrow.

Machu Picchu mountain

And parts went through charming patches of rainforest.

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But the views were more clear now, and we paused to take them in. La Montana Machu Picchu view from above

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Machu Picchu from above

When we returned to the bottom we were exhausted.

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We looked back and up look at The Mountain and felt a swell of pride. See that tiny little flag up there? That’s where we were.

Machu Picchu Mountain la montana

But now it was time to leave. On our way out, we took one final photo.

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It was only 1:00PM but we had had quite a day. We were tired, on top of the world, and still hours away from realizing that germs already inside us were about to take advantage of our exhaustion in the most unappealing ways. But more on that next week.

Cheers,

Will & Elizabeth

Gallery: US Road Trip Roundup

Gallery: US Road Trip Roundup

Our road trip around the US has come to a close.  We are now relaxing in New Hampshire for a week and a half before flying to Peru.  We are spending our days putting the final pieces together for our 10 months abroad.  We hope you enjoy these highlights from the past three weeks!

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