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Month: March 2016

The Palaces and Temples of Udaipur, India

The Palaces and Temples of Udaipur, India

Udaipur has been described as one of the most romantic cities in India. The sites certainly have a romantic ambience, especially when you dine at one of the many rooftop restaurants after sunset. But romance was merely a bonus for us as we focused on taking in the Rajasthani culture.

Day One: We started our first day in Udaipur walking to the Hindu Temple in the center of the city.

udaipur temple india travel

We were astounded by the carvings that covered the building.

udaipur temple india travel

I especially liked these elephants.

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Then we headed to the City Palace – which is actually a very large complex.

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Here, we got a sense of the grandeur of the Rajput kingdoms. As the audio tour told us, the Rajputs were larger than life. The carrier pigeon room and elephant fight wall assured us of that.

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The elephant wall is still there, but this photo better captures its spirit. There were also several tiger transport cages not pictured here.

udaipur city palace india

Day Two: We decided to go on a day trip to the Kumbhalgarh Fort and the Ranakpur Jain Temple – both about an hour outside of Udaipur. The Kumbhalgarh Fort includes the second longest wall in the world, after the Great Wall of China.

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Inside the wall, we visited several temples and the palace, all abandoned.

udaipur fort india travel

The palace at the top of the hill was particularly spooky – with no staging furniture, yet painting still on the walls. This base board depicts elephants behaving badly.

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Here you can see the wall stretch on…but it goes much further than we can see. We could have spent a whole day here – apparently if you follow the wall it takes you to the jungle.

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Then we headed to Ranakpur, a town with a particularly spectacular Jain temple.

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The entire building is craved out of white marble, creating a peaceful and awe-inspiring effect.

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There are 1,444 unique pillars in this temple.

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And many beautiful carvings.

ranakpur temple udaipur india

The day trip to Kumblahgarh and Ranakpur was surprisingly cheap – only 2000 rupees (US$30) for a private car all day. The two sites are about 2hours from Udaipur. Our driver also took us to a scenic, reasonably priced restaurant for lunch. It was all set up by our hotel, Mewargarh Palace.

Not pictured here, we also attended a Rajasthani dance performance at Bagore Ki Haveli. Although meant for tourists, the venue is unique and the dancers were very talented. We had dinner at one of the Havelis – which had a beautiful rooftop view of the lake and the palaces. Although our time was short in Udaipur, we were able to do a lot in this small, culture-rich city.

Student Voices: What Makes a Good Teacher?

Student Voices: What Makes a Good Teacher?

At this point, we’ve spent close to a year traveling the world, visiting schools, and talking with students. One of our most interesting observations from this project is how consistent students are when we ask them a very basic question: ‘What makes a good teacher?’ High-end private school or low-income government school, small children or high school students, South America, Africa, Europe, America, or Asia; students everywhere answer in the same way with nearly the exact same words.

  1. First they say, “They’re nice to us,” or “They don’t yell.” The order of these statements varies a bit, but they are always the first two statements students make.
  2. Next, one student will add, “They help us when we don’t understand.” If there’s a group of students, the rest of the will murmur in affirmation.
  3. Students also tend to say, “Makes learning fun,” which can mean anything from playing games with content or just being an especially engaging lecturer. The point seems to be that the teacher has put some thought into how students will be experiencing class, and she wants to make it enjoyable.

There is sometimes a jokester who chuckles and says something like, “Doesn’t give homework.” And older students at exceptional schools will often talk about strong personal relationships with teachers who seem to be more like mentors. But the first three comments have literally come up every time we’ve asked this question of students, and almost always in that order.

What else is interesting is that students tend to react in essentially the same way when they hear the question. They smile and start answering almost immediately. This is a question they’re comfortable with. They know they have some expertise in this topic, and they’re fairly matter-of-fact about letting us in on what’s so obvious to them.

These comments may not be especially surprising, but I think their clarity and consistency warrant attention. One thing that stands out to me is how personal the comments are. Teachers often think about their relationship with a class, but students hardly ever think of themselves as just one member of a group. They see their relationship as a personal one with the teacher. Students talk about how a good teacher responds when they personally don’t understand far more often than they mention how well that teacher explains something to the whole class.

Teaching is tough, and teachers can get bogged down in disparate responsibilities and constantly changing criteria that they’re supposed to live up to. They get so caught up trying to be what their district and administrators want them to be that they can sometimes forget what their students are looking for. Since good teaching can’t happen without the students’ consent, I’m going to say that this student perspective matters a great deal.

So, teachers, if you’re looking for a few ideas to help anchor your approach to teaching, I might recommend these questions:

  1. Am I nice to my students? How do I show it?
  2. Do I refrain from raising my voice when I need to discipline a student or class?
  3. Do students who struggle get the support that they need?
  4. Can I make class more enjoyable for students while also maintaining/deepening rigor?

I’d like to say that these questions are simple, but anyone who has run a classroom knows that they can be incredibly complicated to address. And that complexity is even more of a reason to keep these reflections in the front of our minds. There are lots of ways to try to improve as teachers, but if we’re not ‘good teachers’ in the eyes of our students, chances are we aren’t going to get very far.

  • Will